18th International Conference of Young Scientists on Energy and Natural Sciences Issues – CYSENI 2022

Registration to the conference and extended abstract submission is now open. We encourage prospective attendees and guests to subscribe to the event CYSENI 2022 for the latest updates.

REGISTRATION: https://cyseni.com/registration/
FACEBOOK EVENT: https://www.facebook.com/events/1534512643587140

DESCRIPTION
We invite you to participate in the 18th International Conference of Young Scientists on Energy and Natural Sciences Issues (CYSENI 2022). Keeping the pandemic in view this conference is scheduled in an online format, from May 24 to 27, 2022.

CYSENI main goal is to discuss issues and perspectives of Natural Sciences and Energy Sector worldwide. Also, this conference allows young scientists, such as undergraduates, MSc, PhD students, postdocs, entrant engineers to develop their skills, make new contacts and forge durable scientific relationships.

If you-re seeking new knowledge and want to share your research, this is the event to attend. Participation in the conference is free of charge!

✅ Important information: this year young researchers can participate in the conference in two ways: to submit the extended abstract or full paper.
✅ Participation with a full paper will have an opportunity to be published with a discount in partner Journals!

CONFERENCE TOPICS AND IMPORTANT DATES: www.cyseni.com/topics-and-deadlines/

Deadlines for extended abstract submission

January 23, 2022 – deadline for registration and extended abstract submission
May 16, 2022 – submission of the recorded presentation

Deadlines for full-paper submission
January 23, 2022 – deadline for registration and extended abstract submission
March 07, 2022 – draft paper submission. Papers have to be prepared
according to the instructions
April 30, 2022 – final paper submission
May 16, 2022 – submission of the recorded presentation

EARTO Network welcomes a new member: LEI (Lithuania)

The EARTO network welcomed a new member: LEI – the Lithuanian Energy Institute in Lithuania. LEI was established in 1956 and has 230 employees. LEI is an internationally recognised energy-related research, development, and innovation (RD&I) competence centre. Its principal activities and services are based on metrology, energy strategy, technical support and research for the energy companies, research and technical support in the field of nuclear safety and decommission for the regulatory bodies and utilities, as well as risk assessment for industrial utilities.

Founded in 1999, EARTO promotes RTOs and represents their interest in Europe. EARTO network counts over 350 RTOs in more than 20 countries. EARTO members represents 150.000 of highly-skilled researchers and engineers managing a wide range of technology infrastructures.



Full EARTO Members list:
https://www.earto.eu/about-earto/members/

LEI Ph.D. student Noura Elsalamouny won The Best Team Project Award given by Argonne National Lab

First Place for The Best Team Project for Excellence in Shipping Innovation in Nuclear Energy Given by Argonne National Lab.

Ph.D. student Noura Elsalamouny (Lithuanian Energy Institute, Laboratory of Nuclear Installation Safety) was participating in Modeling, Experimental and Validation “MEV” summer school 2021. MEV was organized through the cooperation of Multiple stakeholders (Argonne, Idaho, Oak-Rege) national labs. School thematic is Holistic Innovation: Integrating methods, experiments, and people to advance nuclear technology.
Noura Elsalamouny together with other students from other organizations presented joint team project work was titled “The at-home reactor”, which won The Best Team Project Award given by Argonne National Lab.

Fast energy transition and potential challenges in the Baltics

What do the decarbonizing possibilities look like in the Estonian, Latvian, and Lithuanian energy systems in the upcoming decade? The answer to this question will be closer at hand this autumn, as the FasTen project – funded by Nordic Energy Research – is finalizing its first results.

Five key findings

In this interview, Researcher Jana Teremranova from Riga Technical University (RTU), and Junior Research Associate Eimantas Neniškis from LEI give us an insight into the objectives and preliminary conclusions of the project. To begin with, Neniškis tells us about their key findings up until now.

“We have so far analyzed the potential impacts if national plans are followed, and preliminary identified five key outcomes,” says Neniškis. “The first is a rapid transition from fossil-fuels to renewable energy sources in electricity production. In 2017, more than half of generated electricity was from fossil-fuels, but it is likely that this number will be reduced to less than 10 % by 2030, because of Estonian oil shale-based electricity becoming too expensive for the market conditions, and of substantial investments in wind and solar power plants, especially in Lithuania. The second is related to challenges in energy security. We are also worried about energy security. The Baltics plan to disconnect from the BRELL-circle in 2025 – a synchronous grid that covers Russia, Belarus, and the Baltics – which will decrease the total transfer capacity. As fossil capacity is decommissioned or becomes unfeasible, the Baltics are more vulnerable to Nordic and Central European electricity price fluctuations unless new, replacing capacities become available. The third is slow changes in transport and building sectors. As for transport, fossil fuel consumption rises as the traffic volume in passenger kilometers increases faster than the use of alternative fuels. As for buildings, decarbonizing will happen mostly through emission reduction in power and heat sectors. The fourth is that the modelled emissions halved by 2030 (10.5 MtCO2) compared to 2017 (21.8 MtCO2). The fifth is a decrease of overall annualized system costs for electricity production in Estonia, but an increase in Latvia and especially Lithuania.”

These key findings are relevant to observe. “The old paradigm of stable energy infrastructure is not working well,” says Teremranova, and notes that energy development involves inclusion and implementation of renewable sources, which in turn requires well-balanced and calculated steps.

According to Neniškis, significant changes will have to happen if we want to reach Baltic ambitious targets of emission reduction and energy independence. “Unfortunately, everything comes at a certain cost. Therefore, each step must be well-calculated and observed. We shouldn’t dive in headfirst. For this reason, we have modelled measures, described the Baltics’ National Energy and Climate Plans (NECPs), and analyzed outcomes in the FasTen project,” he says.

Different roles for different sectors

On the Baltics’ journey towards decarbonization, Teremranova explains that “all sectors are important, though there are differences. Heat and power generation currently account for most of the emissions from the energy sector, which is why it is of greatest interest to restructure and model the replacement of fuels with renewable energy sources.”

Neniškis agrees. “Decarbonizing the power sector first is of great importance, as it determines the effectiveness of electrification and emission reduction measures in other sectors, such as the buildings sector. Most likely, the decarbonization of the power sector will happen through greater use of variable renewable sources,” he says. “As for the district heating sector, already more than half of the heat is produced from biomass or waste in Lithuania and Latvia. In Estonia, however, about a third of the heat is produced from oil shale and should be replaced by biomass.”

When it comes to the transport sector, “substantial changes are not expected within the next ten years,” says Neniškis. This is “due to the high costs of replacing fuel-powered vehicles with electric ones, and to the need for additional rules and regulations,” according to Teremranova.

Considerations on national level and as a Baltic whole

In addition to the roles of different sectors in the Baltic energy system, the different countries in the Baltic region play their own parts. Simultaneously, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania need to make considerations as a Baltic whole.

“Regarding the power system, we are all in the same boat,” says Neniškis. “Changes in one Baltic country affect all three. The biggest and most impactful changes that await us include the disconnection from the BRELL-circle, a rapid increase of variable renewable sources in electricity generation and phasing out of oil shale power plants in Estonia.”

Teremranova concurs on the closure of Estonian oil shale factories and the planning of new power generation capacities, but also emphasizes the role of transport. “For the Baltics as a whole, the decarbonization of the transport sector is one of the most crucial to achieve climate goals. It is necessary to implement new policies and constraints to limit fossil fueled cars in favor of electric hybrid vehicles,” she says. As for Latvia, “a lot of natural gas is used to generate heat, which emits CO2 and increases the country’s dependence on import”, while in Lithuania “the closure of several old Combined Heat and Power plants (CHP) brings about an acute issue of capacity to cover the demand for heat and power. This is planned to be taken care of through installation of new wind farms,” elaborates Teremranova.

The future after FasTen

“In each of the sectors, more detailed observation and modelling is needed, as well as the expansion of the modelling horizon until 2050,” says Teremranova. She is planning to “model Riga’s energy supply and consumption in detail, in order to predict the best way for Riga to move onto a new, green path towards becoming a smart city.”

Neniškis expands on what will succeed the FasTen project. “We are going to continue our work in a follow-up Amber project, where we aim to find long-term policy pathways to achieve national and EU emission targets in the coming decades. The analysis of the Amber project will surpass FasTen in both scope and detail,” he concludes.

Background: FasTen

FasTen is short for Fast, flexible, and secure decarbonization of the Baltic states – possible progress in the next Ten years, and like the name suggests, the project seeks to investigate the prospects of speeding up the journey towards a decarbonized Baltic region. This FasTened journey explores the potential to make the data and modelling methods more reliable, to deepen the Nordic-Baltic co-operation by sharing know-how, and to reach out to key stakeholders of the Baltic energy policy with the project findings.

The FasTen project is part of The joint Baltic-Nordic Energy Research Program and funded by Nordic Energy Research, and its project partners are Technical Research Center of Finland (VTT), Riga Technical University (RTU), Lithuanian Energy Institute (LEI), and Tallinn Technical University (TalTech).

Kevin Johnsen

Please be informed that as of October, 2021 the legal form of the Lithuanian Energy Institute is a Public Institution

Please be informed that as of October, 2021 the legal form of the Lithuanian Energy Institute is a Public Institution.

We would like to inform you that in accordance with the Government of the Republic of Lithuania September 22, 2021 Resolution No. 777 “On the Reorganization of the Lithuanian Energy Institute, Approval of the Statute of the Lithuanian Energy Institute, investment and transfer of state property under the State Property Trust Agreement” (link) Lithuanian Energy Institute (legal name is: Lietuvos energetikos institutas), located at Breslaujos str. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas, Lithuania (company code 111955219, data is collected and stored in the Register of Legal Entities, VAT no LT119552113), changed the legal form from the budget institution Lietuvos energetikos institutas to the public institution Lietuvos energetikos institutas. The public institution is owned by the Republic of Lithuania, the rights and obligations of ownership are held by the Ministry of Science, Education and Sport of the Republic of Lithuania.

The new Statute of the Lithuanian Energy Institute and the sets of financial and budget execution reports are available on the Internet at www.lei.lt

TRANSWAT project expedition on the Varduva river

TRANSWAT Project experts Vytautas Akstinas, Darius Jakimavičius and Project Communication Specialist Simonas Mikalauskis on September 14-16, 2021 went on an expedition, during which the flow rates in different sections of the Varduva River and the Kviste River were measured.

The aim of TRANSWAT project is to ensure joint assessment and management of trans-boundary river and lake water bodies which hydromorphological and/or ecological quality pose a risk for not meeting the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) requirements.

More about the project: https://www.lei.lt/en/transwat
Project is financed by: Interreg V-A Latvian–Lithuanian cross-border cooperation Programme 2014–2020. http://www.latlit.eu/


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The contents of this publication are the sole responsibility of Lithuanian Energy Institute and can under no circumstances be regarded as reflecting the position of the Eu

Competition for additional admission to the doctoral studies 2021

The Lithuanian Energy Institute announces a competition for Additional Admission to a limited number of state-funded full-time doctoral studies in the fields of Energetics and Power Engineering, Environmental Engineering and Economics.

Applicants have to submit the documents via e-mail studijos@lei.lt or submit to Breslaujos st. 3, LT-44403 Kaunas, Lithuania, room AK-233. The paper version of documets will be asked when signing a study agreement.

Important dates and deadlines:
Submission of applications:
from September 13, 2021 (8 a. m. – 4.30 p. m.) till September 17, 2021 (8 a. m. – 1 p. m.)

Motivational interviews:
21-24 September, 2021

You will find all the information and Doctoral research topics for candidates to doctoral studies intake 2021 here:
https://www.lei.lt/en/phd-studies/additional-admission-to-phd-studies-2021/

Contact person

Studies Administrator Jolanta Kazakevičienė
Address Breslaujos str. 3 – 233, LT-44403 Kaunas
Phone +370 37 401809
E-mail studijos@lei.lt

The Mid-term results of the TRANSWAT project were presented at the Institute

The two-day long TRANSWAT (LLI-533) project seminar ended, during which the Mid-term results of the project were presented.

More about the project: https://www.lei.lt/en/transwat
Project is financed by: Interreg V-A Latvian–Lithuanian cross-border cooperation Programme 2014–2020. http://www.latlit.eu/


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The contents of this publication are the sole responsibility of Lithuanian Energy Institute and can under no circumstances be regarded as reflecting the position of the European Union.

Expedition of scientists of the Laboratory of Hydrology

On August 2-6th and 16-20th, the scientists of the LEI Hydrology Laboratory went to study the hydromorphology of the Varduva River and perform the measurements required to create a hydrodynamic model of the Varduva River.

More about the project: https://www.lei.lt/en/transwat
Project is financed by: Interreg V-A Latvian–Lithuanian cross-border cooperation Programme 2014–2020. http://www.latlit.eu/


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The contents of this publication are the sole responsibility of Lithuanian Energy Institute and can under no circumstances be regarded as reflecting the position of the European Union.

Additional admission to Doctoral studies at LEI is approaching

Competition for Additional Admission to a limited number of state-funded full-time doctoral studies is approaching!

Lithuanian Energy Institute invites active students who have obtained a master’s degree in mathematics, physics, chemistry, energy, thermal engineering, materials engineering, electrical engineering, mechanics, environmental engineering, natural sciences, economics to contribute to the goals of the European Green Deal and apply to doctoral studies in the fields of Energetics and Power Engineering, Environmental Engineering and Economics.

Doctoral research topics for candidates to doctoral studies admission 2021: https://www.lei.lt/en/phd-studies/admission-to-phd-studies/

Why you should choose PhD studies at LEI?

☑️ It doesn’t have to end with studies – LEI could also become a workplace for a future scientist! The Lithuanian Energy Institute is a great place for a researcher seeking stability and long-term career development.

☑️ The Institute creates conditions for employment, self-realization and improvement by enabling participation in seminars, international projects, international conferences, and internships in recognized research centers abroad.

☑️ Doctoral studies at LEI are based on practical scientific work, therefore it is attractive for those who do not want to work as a lecturer (although there is an opportunity to do so).

☑️ Doctoral students admitted to state-funded positions receive monthly scholarships: during the 1st year – 760 Euro/month, during the 2nd-4th years – 880 Euro/month.

An additional admission will be announced in September, 2021.

For more information: https://www.lei.lt/en/phd-studies/